Monthly Archives: January 2020

Get Educated With IGNOU Distance Learning Now! – Education

There is a very thin line of difference between Distance Learning and online education. Both aim at making the education system more flexible and accessible. As a matter of fact, all online education programs can be categorized as distance learning courses, however, this is not the case vice versa. The only difference is the technology and the means used by the distance and online education system to recognize these mentioned goals.Talking about IGNOU distance learning or Indira Gandhi National Open University, offers several distance learning programs in almost every discipline covered by traditional regular schools, colleges and institutes. From Engineering to Public Administration, it offers distance learning courses at all levels, i.e. from Graduation to PhD.Since 1985, IGNOU has been serving the educational realm with utmost dedication and responsibility, thereby, making a significant mark in fostering the development of higher education all over the country through the Open and Distance Learning.Owing to its highly flexible features, IGNOU is recognized as the “People’s University”. It has adopted a learner friendly approach and follows the policy of flexibility in terms of:

Required qualifications
Time taken to complete a program
Place of study
IGNOU has made noteworthy endeavors in bringing education to every nook and cranny of the nation. At present it provides for 338 programs, about 3,500 courses and caters to the educations aspirations of more than 30 lakh students.The IGNOU library is an ingenious national information centre which draws light on the concept of Distance Education. Established in 1886, IGNOU library is a largest collection of books, journals and other related materials on Distance education which strive to uphold the aims and objectives of IGNOU.To know about the various fields of study covered by IGNOU, take a look at the following list of IGNOU Schools:

School of agriculture
School of Performing and Visual Arts
School of Computer and information Sciences
School of Education
School of Engineering and Technology
School of Extension and Development Studies
School of Foreign Languages
School of Gender and Development Studies
School of Health Sciences
School of Humanities
School of Inter Disciplinary And trans-Disciplinary Studies
School of Journalism and New Media Studies
School of Law
School of Management Studies
School of Sciences
School of Social Sciences
School of Social Work
School of Tourism Hospitality Service Sectoral Management
School of Translation Studies and Training
School of Vocational Education and Training
For more than two decades, with several study centers spread all over the country IGNOU has worked upon education Indians who could not avail the traditional education mode due to distance, financial or time constraints.Keep in tone with the present online education technology, today IGNOU distance learning has adopted online means for imparting education. One can rightly say, nationally, IGNOU has played the role of a protagonist in the field of Distance learning.

Educational Travel in Turkey

Educational trips in Turkey are a pleasant opportunity for Classical students to see important and impressive sites in the ancient world. The large complex at Ephesus, including the Celsus Library, will surely be blown away, while excavations at Troy raise questions about archeological practices. The city of Istanbul is a completely different experience: a multicultural city that develops in the active continuation of multi-millennial history at the crossroads of culture.

Ephesus – Near present-day Selçuk in the Ä°zmir Province of western Turkey, Ephesus is a renowned archaeological site and an essential stop on any educational travel itinerary of the country. The area has been inhabited for at least eight thousand years and may first be mentioned in writing in Hittite sources, which mention a city of Apasa (or Abasa) under the control of the Ahhiyawans (most likely the name used by Hittites to refer to the Achaeans, ie: the early Greeks) in the mid-2nd millennium BC. The city grew and prospered in the Greek, Hellenistic and Roman eras, and it was in the latter that the Library of Celsus was constructed, in honour of the Senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus.

Students visiting the site on their educational travel will find the Library of Celsus impressive: a two-storey façade has been reconstructed from surviving pieces, providing a strong impression of the building’s original impact. A single column now represents the Temple of Artemis, once a Wonder of the Ancient World, but the sprawling scale of the site will give students a strong taste of the ancient site.

Troy – Troy is arguably one of the most controversial archaeological sites: the site of a literary war, the historicity of which continues to be debated, and clumsily excavated by Heinrich Schliemann in the 19th century. His desire to find Homeric Troy led him to garb his wife in golden jewellery and destroy parts of the site. There are many layers of ruins at Troy, representing millennia of occupation: an excellent example of educational travel giving students the opportunity to see the complexity of archaeological sites and discuss excavation methodologies and practice.

Istanbul – Unlike Troy, which is located in ruins, Istanbul is a thriving city with a history reaching back to the ancient world. Educational trips to Istanbul can bring students to Hagia Sofia, which brings about a change in religion in the city; allows them to walk through the Hippodrome; and went under the city to the Cistern Byzantine Basilica with its three hundred thirty-six columns. The two columns in the northwest corner of the reservoir, with the face of the Gorgon, are the most extraordinary individually, but the enormity of the structure is the most amazing feature. It was only one of several hundred ancient water tanks under the city. Modern Istanbul above these ancient rooms shows students what happens when an ancient site does not disappear from use.

Film Schools Education

When making plans for a career in film, Kansas City might not be the first goal someone thought of to receive an education. Interestingly, this city has always been stereotyped with middle-aged American caricatures that are always associated with the heart. However, Kansas City is a busy metropolitan area, and therefore has several options for learning, such as filmmaking. Therefore, if you are looking for a Kansas City film school, consider the following options first.

A university education with a communications emphasis – Many of the colleges in the vicinity provide majors in the different aspects of communication including film. The benefit is that you obtain a well-rounded education that permits for certain flexibility in the event you eventually decide film is not for you. The bad news is, you will lack the industry specifics and you would even lack the experience in handling up-to-date equipment; in effect, you’d require some more coaching after graduation.

A specialized education at a trade or art school – This alternative is offered by one of the several Kansas City film schools. The issue of specialization is answered as this shall certainly give you just the kind of specialized education that you require. On the other side of the coin, you would need to pay for a higher price because of the need to keep equipment current. With this alternative, it is absolutely clear that if you want a cut-throat education, you need to “show them the money”.

The apprentice-mentor approach – This learning approach is patterned on the idea that mentorship is essential to any type of learning. In this set-up, the studio becomes the classroom and industry professionals become your teachers. This option is way more effective than the other educational methods mentioned above due to the fact that learning is hastened when students are put in a real-life setting; moreover, costs are lowered because the need for a separate classroom is taken away. Job placement following graduation is also made more simple, because not only are the connections included in the education, however when the student graduates, he/she already has important real-life experience by trying their wings in a real-world environment.

You will find each of these options available at the Kansas City film school. With all this, all you need to do is decide which alternative is right for you.

A Bondage of Education – Education

From a very early age I can remember my parents, teachers, and friends discussing this idea of education. What it is, what it should be, what it could be, but more importantly how I would use it to “further” my life. I had this notion that education was going to school, memorizing what the teacher said, applying it to a test, and repeating the routine for the next twelve years. The term “career ready” is not only what gave me the desire to have straight A’s in high school, but what brought me to a university. I came with hope to finally break away from the restraint that I believed was only a result of what a high school education could do to an individual’s mind, but quickly came to realize that a “liberal education” from college was not that different. Liberal education was designed to free individuals from the bonds that society placed upon them, but present-day education is what holds those bonds together.I will never forget the first time I failed a test. It was in fifth with one of my favorite teachers. I remember receiving the test back with a zero on the front and instantly covering the test up so no one could not see the sign of failure. The teacher must have seen my shock because I was told to stay after class. She explained to me how I had made a 100 but I did not “take the test right” which is what resulted in the zero. From then on, I developed what college students call “test anxiety.” I worked to follow directions, to be structured, and to never ask a question that could possibly be wrong. I made straight A’s, participated in school organizations, was president of my class, and lived to fill the resume that would be sent to potential colleges. I did what students are expected to do. When I came to college I was excited because I could finally learn outside the perimeters of standardized tests. What I did not expect was to hear phrases from professors such as, “don’t worry this will not be on the test,” or having to spend thirty minutes of class listening to students ask how many questions will be on the exam. Teachers from my high school always told us, “college will not be like this, so enjoy it while you can,” but it was all the same. Listen, take notes, memorize, take test, repeat.I began to realize that maybe this was what education was intended to be. A system that engrains students with the idea that to conform and restrain one’s mind to standardization is what makes us “successful.” David Brooks discusses how college students are “goal-orientated… a means for self-improvement, resume-building, and enrichment. College is just one step on the continual stairway of advancement and they are always aware that they must get to the next step.” Students go through elementary, junior high, high school, and now even universities not to “free our minds” or truly educating ourselves, but to climb the ladder of social order. One can relate education to Plato’s cave allegory, “they are in it from childhood with their legs and necks in bonds so that they are fixed, seeing only in front of them unable because of the bond to turn their heads.” This system of education that parents, professors, politicians, employers, and even students talk so highly about is not about producing the world’s next great minds, it is about producing the world’s next source of capital. Society has taken a liberal education and twisted it to where it will fit students into its workplace.Everyone says that your first semester of college is the hardest. You move away from home, meet new people, and are thrown into a whole new environment. I knew it would be tough, but never thought I would be the student that curled onto her dorm room rug and cried over a seventy-eight on a couple of tests. I had made back-to-back “failing grades” in my mind and had the mindset that I could never recover. What could I accomplish without a 4.0 GPA and four years on the Deans List? To make matters worse, I received a zero for a homework assignment. Believing that there must have been something wrong, I made my way to my TAs office hours where he proceeded to tell me that I did great on the assignment but had to give me a zero based on a small technicality. That is when I had the realization that a modern-day college education has nothing to do with a liberal education. From then on, every test I would take and grade that followed would no longer determine how I would go about learning. I decided that in order to receive a true liberal education I had to throw away every concept of what I thought education was. In Plato’s book I was reminded that “education is not what the professions of certain men assert it to be” and when I decided to make my way out of ‘the cave’ of education I was thankful for the realization that I had broken the bonds that society tried so hard to place tightly around me. Leo Strauss said that a “liberal education supplies us with experience in things beautiful,” and that is when an individual is truly free.I sometimes think about where I would be if I had the mindset that I do now about education when I received that zero if fifth grade. Would I have waved it in the air as a badge of pride representing how I refused to conform to the institution instead of hiding it from my friends in shame or would I had done it all the same? A true liberal education is what enables individuals to achieve, admire, and model greatness. So, when I hear a professor repeat the phrase “don’t worry, this won’t be on the test,” a part of me wonders if even they have given up on helping break the bonds placed upon us.

Educational Travel Experiences in Barcelona

Barcelona is a city with many recommended places for every traveler, it is also very useful for students; vibrant and fashionable, it will surely cling to students’ minds while broadening their horizons with new cultural knowledge and experience. Famous for its stunning architecture, warm weather and delicious food, the city combines historic grandeur with young spirit, and is thus full of opportunities to attract young visitors. The following are some of the most interesting attractions for teachers and students.

PortAventura – For many teachers, the secret to successful educational travel is striking the right balance between learning and fun. Not far from central Barcelona, PortAventura theme park provides plenty of fun – as well as some great learning opportunities. The thrilling shows and rides – including Europe’s highest roller coaster – on offer are located in a variety of zones depicting different parts of the ancient or modern world, including the Mediterranean, Mexico and Polynesia. Each has an educational content that can be taken in while enjoying the rides. There is also plenty of potential for science or maths related activities, with the opportunity to examine the effects of physics and investigate the park’s engineering.

Gaudi’s Masterpieces – For art lovers, Barcelona will need little introduction: the city is almost synonymous with the striking architectural works of the great Catalonian artist Antoni Gaudi. Educational travel is an excellent opportunity to investigate the work of artists in their cultural contexts, and this is particularly true of Gaudi’s legacy, which is very much part of the city’s heritage. Some of the most famous examples of his work include the Sagrada Familia and the sculptures in Parc Guell, but there are many more buildings and other creations to be discovered throughout the city. For greater insight into the importance of Gaudi’s work, students can visit the National Art Museum of Catalonia, where they can learn about the artist’s contemporaries in the Catalonian modernist movement.

Las Ramblas – Bustling, colourful and full of things to see and do, the city’s main thoroughfare, Las Ramblas, makes an excellent starting point for any group visiting Barcelona for the purpose of educational travel. This broad, tree-shaded boulevard extends for 1.2 km across the heart of the city, and is where residents and visitors alike come to shop, talk, and soak up the atmosphere. Given its central location, it is home to a number of sights as well as being an attraction in its own right: look out for the famous Canaletes fountain, the Miro mosaic, and the Liceu Theatre. Adjoining the road, La Boqueria market is full of interesting stalls, and is ideal for experiencing the daily life of the city.

4 Strategies to Become a Transformative Educator – Education

When you are assigned a class and students arrive, do you view yourself as a teacher, instructor, or educator? Is your role a function, one which completes tasks and responsibilities, or do you aspire to accomplish more with your students? Do you consider the instructional strategies you use now to be transformative in some manner, or would you like to somehow transform the students you teach?A person enters the field of education as a profession, either full-time in a traditional academic institution or as an adjunct (or part time) instructor. A traditional full-time professor may likely be responsible for conducting research, teaching, and publishing scholarly work. An adjunct instructor may teach in a community college, traditional college, or an online school. When someone teaches students within the field of higher education, he or she may be called a facilitator, instructor, or professor. This is important as you won’t find a job title with the word educator in it.Does this mean that everyone who is a teacher, professor, instructor, faculty member, or adjunct, is also an educator? What I have learned through my work in higher education is that everyone who is in one of these roles is doing their best to teach and guide a learning process, whether they are involved in undergraduate or graduate degree courses. However, someone who considers themselves to be an educator is a person who goes beyond the role of teaching and seeks to lead a transformational learning process. I have learned myself that becoming an educator is not an automatic process. It takes time, practice, and dedication to become an engaging and transformative educator.A Basic Definition of a TeacherTeaching is generally associated with traditional, primary education. Classes at this level are teacher-led and children as students are taught what and how to learn. The teacher is the expert and directs the learning process. A teacher is someone highly trained and works to engage the minds of his or her students. This style of teacher-led instruction continues into higher education, specifically traditional college classrooms. The teacher still stands at the front and center of the class delivering information, and students are used to this format because of their experience in primary education. The instructor disseminates knowledge through a lecture, and students will study to pass the required examinations or complete other required learning activities.Within higher education, teachers may be called instructors and they are hired as subject matter experts with advanced content or subject matter expertise. The job requirements usually include holding a specific number of degree hours in the subject being taught. Teachers may also be called professors in traditional universities, and those positions require a terminal degree with additional research requirements. For all of these roles, teaching is meant to signify someone who is guiding the learning process by directing, telling, and instructing students. The instructor or professor is in charge, and the students must comply and follow as directed.Here is something to consider: If this is the essence of teaching, is there a difference between teaching and educating students? Is the role of a teacher the same as that of an educator?Basic Definitions of an EducatorI would like for you to consider some basic definitions to begin with as a means of understanding the role of an educator. The word “education” refers to giving instruction; “educator” refers to the person who provides instruction and is someone skilled in teaching; and “teaching” is aligned with providing explanations. I have expanded upon these definitions so the word “educator” includes someone who is skilled with instruction, possesses highly developed academic skills, and holds both subject matter knowledge, along with knowledge of adult education principles.• Skilled with Instruction: An educator is someone who should be skilled in the art of classroom instruction, knowing what instructional strategies are effective and the areas of facilitation that need further development.An experienced educator develops methods which will bring course materials to life by adding relevant context and prompting students to learn through class discussions and other learning activities. Instruction also includes all of the interactions held with students, including all forms of communication, as every interaction provides an opportunity for teaching.• Highly Developed Academic Skills: An educator must also have strong academic skills and at the top of that list are writing skills. This requires strong attention to detail on the part of the educator must include all forms of messages communicated. The ability to demonstrate strong academic skills is especially important for anyone who is teaching online classes as words represent the instructor.The use of proper formatting guidelines, according to the style prescribed by the school, is also included in the list of critical academic skills. For example, many schools have implemented APA formatting guidelines as the standard for formatting papers and working with sources. An educator cannot adequately guide students and provide meaningful feedback if the writing style has not been mastered.• Strong Knowledge Base: An educator needs to develop a knowledge base consisting of their subject matter expertise, as related to the course or courses they are teaching, along with knowledge of adult education principles. I know of many educators who have the required credit hours on their degree transcripts, yet they may not have extensive experience in the field they teach. This will still allow them to teach the course, provided they take time to read the required textbook or materials, and find methods of applying it to current practices within the field.Many schools hire adjuncts with work experience as the primary criteria, rather than knowledge of adult learning principles. When I have worked with faculty who do have studied adult education theory, they generally acquired it through ongoing professional development. That was my goal when I decided on a major for my doctorate degree, to understand how adults learn so I could transform my role and become an educator.4 Strategies to Become a Transformative EducatorI do not believe many instructors intentionally consider the need to make a transformation from working as an instructor to functioning as an educator. When someone is hired to teach a class, someone other than a traditional college professor, they often learn through practice and time what works well in the classroom. There will likely be classroom audits and recommendations made for ongoing professional development.Gradually the typical instructor will become an educator as they seek out resources to help improve their teaching practices. However, I have worked with many adjunct online instructors who rely upon their subject matter expertise alone and do not believe there is a reason to grow as an educator.For anyone who would like to become an engaging and transformative educator, there are strategies which can be can be implemented.Strategy #1: Transform Through Development of Your Instructional PracticeWhile any educator can learn through time on the job, it is possible to become intentional about this growth. There are numerous online resources, publications, workshops, webinars, and professional groups which will allow you to learn new methods, strategies, and practices. There are also social media websites such as LinkedIn and Twitter which allow for the exchange of ideas and resources within a global community of educators.You can also utilize self-reflection as a means of gauging your effectiveness. I have found that the best time to review my instructional practice occurs immediately after a class has concluded. That is a time when I can assess the strategies I have used and determine if those methods were effective. Even reviewing end of course student surveys may provide insight into the perspective of my students, whether or not every survey submitted was positive. Students tend to submit a survey response either when they are happy or greatly unhappy about the course. Either way, I can learn something about what my students have experienced during the class.Strategy #2: Transform Through Development of Your Academic SkillsI know from my work with online faculty development this is an area of development many educators could use. However, it is often viewed as a low priority until it is noted in classroom audits. If an educator has weak academic writing skills, it will interfere with their ability to provide comprehensive feedback for students.For online instructors, this has an even greater impact when posted messages contain errors with spelling, grammar, and formatting. The development of academic skills can be done through the use of online resources or workshops. Many online schools I have worked for offer faculty workshops and this is a valuable self-development resource.Strategy #3: Transform Through Development of Your Subject Matter ExpertiseEvery educator has subject matter expertise they can draw upon. However, the challenge is keeping this knowledge current as you continue to teach for several years. The best advice I can offer is find resources which allow you to read and learn about current thinking, research, and best practices in your chosen field.This is essential to your instructional practice as students can easily tell whether you appear to be current in your knowledge, or outdated and seemingly out of touch. Even the use of required textbooks or resources does not ensure that you are utilizing the most current information as knowledge evolves quickly in many fields.Strategy #4: Transform Through Development of Your Knowledge of Adult LearningThe last step or strategy I can recommend is to gain knowledge about adult learning theories, principles, and practices. If you are not familiar with the basics there are concepts you can research and includes critical thinking, andragogy, self-directed learning, transformational learning, learning styles, motivation, and cognition.My suggestion is to find and read online sources related to higher education and then find a subject that interests you to research further. I have found the more I read about topics I enjoy, the more I am cultivating my interest in ongoing professional development. What you will likely find is what you learn will have a positive influence on your work as an educator and this will enhance all areas of your instructional practice.Working as an educator, or someone who is highly engaged in the process of helping students learn, starts with a commitment to make this a career rather than a job. I have developed a vision related to how I want to be involved in each class I teach and I recommend the same strategy for you. You may find it useful to develop teaching goals for your career and link your classroom performance to those goals. For example, do you want to complete the required facilitation tasks, or would you rather put in the additional time necessary to create nurturing class conditions?After developing a vision and teaching goals, you can create a professional development plan to prompt your learning and growth in all of the areas I have addressed above. While this strategy may require an investment of time, it is helpful to remember that we always make time for whatever we believe is most important. Being an educator is not sustaining a focus on job functions, rather it is cultivating a love of what you do and learning how to excel for the benefit of your students. Becoming an engaging and transformative educator occurs when you decide teaching students is only part of the learning process, and you work to transform who you are and how you function, while working and interacting with your students.When you transform your teaching or faculty role and become an educator, regardless of your job title, you also transform the learning experience of your students. You provide for them the critical element necessary for real learning to occur, substantive instructor involvement and engagement. More importantly, you humanize the learning experience and you can help to nurture their developmental needs. Students will leave your class transformed in some manner, having learned something they can apply to their academic pursuits, life, and/or career. You will be transformed and so will your students.